Keeping the Memory Alive

It is important to continue to study and honor the shared history of the United States and China during World War II. Here you can view photos from U.S. Consulate Chengdu’s visits to historic sites around Southwest China. If you are interested in visiting historic WWII sites in Southwest China, below are a list of …

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Veteran Recollections

In this section, we share memories of World War II veterans. From Wayne Johnson, the 23rd Fighter Group, 14th Air Force  “The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor brought on a surge of patriotism throughout America. I signed up for the U.S. Army Air Corps on 8 December, 1941… After completion of the Air Corps pilot …

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Merrill’s Marauders

Though tens of thousands of Americans served in the China-Burma-India Theater, only a fraction were combat troops on the front line. These were the men of the 5307th Composite Unit, known by their nickname Merrill’s Marauders. Led by their commander Brigadier General Frank Merrill, the Marauders were formed as a long-range penetration jungle warfare unit. …

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General Joseph W. Stilwell

Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor by Japan on December 7, 1941, the United States officially entered the Second World War. In early 1942, President Franklin Roosevelt dispatched General Joseph Stilwell to China to advise the Chinese and coordinate Allied forces in the region. Among American generals, Stilwell was already known as an experienced China …

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Claire Lee Chennault

Before he arrived in China, Claire Lee Chennault was considered a maverick by the United States Army Air Corps. While the Army Air Corp focused on high-altitude bombing tactics, Chennault advocated for the use of pursuit fighter aircraft. His ideas often put him at odds with his superiors, leading to his resignation from the military …

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The China Air Task Force and 14th Air Force

With the entrance of the United States into the Second World War, there was no longer a need for American pilots to serve as volunteers in the Chinese Air Force as the American Volunteer Group (AVG) did. In the AVG’s wake came official pilots of the United States military. Though these pilots openly served under …

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The American Volunteer Group (The “Flying Tigers”)

In April 1941, American President Franklin Roosevelt issued a secret executive order authorizing reserve officers and enlisted men to resign from the Army Air Corps, Naval and Marine air services for the purpose of serving in the American Volunteer Group (AVG) under the command of Claire Lee Chennault. Chennault divided his unit of 100 P-40 …

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